Monday, June 6, 2016

Monotony



I’ll admit it.  It doesn’t feel much like love when I’m doing it.  Laying out bread, layering meat, cheese, lettuce.  Slicing apples.  Refilling water bottles.  Granola bars.  Crackers.  Daily packing lunches to be eaten by hungry kids the next day just feels like a task.  And one I often feel like not doing.  But that’s love, isn’t it?  And my kids never wonder if and when they will get their next meal.  Never.  With tears, I am grateful for this privilege I dismiss as monotonous duty.

the happiest chirp
at the freshly filled feeder
humbled, I’m quickened


© 2016 Jennifer Wagner




Note:  I believe my haiku to be classified as more of a senryu since it includes the human element with nature/season.  Thanks for reading!



19 comments:

  1. The routine of packing food gets me too ~ One day, your child will say enough and you realize that they are teens already and want to buy food with their friends ~ Love the grateful post, including the happiest chirp ~

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  2. This touched me so much. My husband is the cook and his meals are just the best expression of his love. Love is often not about "feeling," is it.

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  3. Such a wonderful metaphor in your Haiku! Resonate with your prose. Thanks for sharing.

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  4. Wonderful. How great that you equate so much with the packing of their lunches and the haiku ties right in there with it. One reason I asked for a real haiku and not a faux-ku. The feeding of the birds, the feeding of the kids - it all is so great. Good job!

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  5. Packing their lunches is a task that ends too soon. I used to pack "I love you" notes into the wrapping around my kids'sandwiches. They pretended to be embarrassed, but I think they liked it.

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  6. Love the bird feeder analogy..nicely done!

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  7. Love this, Jennifer. As a mama and a poet. The bird feeder analogy is wonderful.

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  8. Such a touching haibun. I thought that your use of the word "privilege" was so wise and loving. I once mentioned to a friend that I considered that being a mom to four kids was a privilege. She looked somewhat quizzical, for a moment, and then said: you know, you're right: I just never thought of all that work and worry as a privilege ... but it is, isn't it.

    I also thought that the haiku worked wonderfully well with the prose. "the happiest chirp" is delightful! A lovely post, Jennifer.

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  9. I love the love you pack into that lunch pack... Here in Sweden we have free lunch provided at school, so there is no such love required.. I do love the haiku in the end.

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  10. It's a long time since I packed a lunchbox. I remember when my husband and I were first married and we used to put little notes in with the sandwiches. A lovely reminder, Jennifer.

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  11. Beautifully written haibun. It is an act of love, even the simple fact of preparing lunch and the gratitude that goes along with it. Your haiku complements this nicely and brings the nature element and the same feeling of nurture. :)

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  12. This is lovely. The mundane often shows the greatest and most unconditional daily love.

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  13. I posted a comment but it seemed to have disappeared! Loved the haibun, the honesty of the piece is keenly felt. The last line of the haiku is complete insight. Thanks for this write.

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  14. Wonderful poem and a big Thank you! for the day in and day out love you send to our boys...

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  15. Yes, 'tis love. Love is most definitely a verb, and the actions are often mundane and repetitive. However, your loving acts provide an essential "structure" to your boys' lives. Look around at all the structure in your life that you neglect to mention and think of how grateful you are. Yes, I learned early on (as a step-Pop-o) that if you're taking care of your kids for acclaim, you'll be sorely disappointed. If you're taking care of them because you love them and want them to have a better life than you, and the accolades don't matter, then it'll be much more rewarding. Love the bird feeder imagery - it is perfect.

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  16. I love how you swing from feeding your children to the birds feeding at the feeder. That day to day structure and nurture are the most important way of loving, I think.

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  17. I enjoyed reading this sensitive, relatable piece, from the top down to the happiest chirp!

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  18. You are packing memories of love.

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  19. my 2 are growing so darn fast. I'd gather, with 4, it's twice as poignant ~

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Thank you for your thoughts!